Leaked internal document shows China gunned down several Tibetans in March 2008 protests

Phayul[Thursday, August 21, 2014 18:45]

DHARAMSHALA: A Tibetan advocacy group has exposed what it calls Chinese government’s “irrefutable evidence” against the latter’s attempt to conceal the number of Tibetans its armed forces have filled in retaliation to protests by Tibetans on March 14, in Lhasa from where the wave of demonstrations against the regime was witnessed in 2008, the year Beijing hosted the Olympic Games.

In a secret document smuggled out of Tibet by a Tibetan political fugitive who got arrested for involvement in protests in 2008, the Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) released an analysis of the document written in Chinese about Tibetans killed by Chinese security forces during the March 2008 protests in Lhasa. The document obtained was based on the autopsy reports prepared on 21 March 2008 by the medical department of Lhasa Public Security Bureau.

TCHRD has said the regime used machine guns to kill Tibetans during the March 2008 protests in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa, contrary to what the regime claims that Chinese forces did not use lethal weapons were not used.

The document, translated into English by the centre, contains the names of those Tibetans killed by Chinese security forces and whose dead bodies were kept at Lhasa’s Xishan mortuary. The official document also consists of autopsy reports of four dead Tibetans. Li Wen Zhen and Wang Zhai Shai, both heads of criminal and medical examination department of the Lhasa Public Security Bureau performed the autopsy.

This internal document was prepared on 21 March 2008 and is titled “Document of the criminal and medical examination department of the Public Security Bureau, Lhasa.”

“The document serves as concrete evidence that Chinese security forces killed Tibetans in different localities in Lhasa city during the initial protests in March 2008 that ignited the 2008 Uprising in large parts of the Tibetan plateau”, said Tsering Tsomo, who heads the group based here.

“All the information revealed in the secret document confirms the killing of Tibetan protestors by the Chinese security forces, and lay bare the attempts by Chinese government to put the blame for violence witnessed during the March 2008 protest on the heads of the Tibetan people. In short, the Chinese government made use of all sorts of propaganda and lies in both the domestic and international media, using video footages and photographs of Tibetans smashing police cars and windows of houses, to manipulate the views of domestic and international audience and thus project the Tibetan uprising as violent,” said Tsomo.

During a visit by foreign journalists and foreign diplomats on 28 March 2008 to Jokhang Temple in Lhasa, a group of monks bore witness to Chinese repression by tearfully repudiating official propaganda in public by risking everything. One of the monks even said that he saw the body of a Tibetan shot dead by the Chinese security forces, the TCHRD said.

However, during an official Chinese press conference organized on 17 March 2008 in Beijing, Jampa Phuntsok, then governor of the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) retorted, “In this smashing and looting activities, the security forces [Public Security Bureau and People’s Armed Police] have not used lethal weapons. They have never shot protestors.”

“There were 22 dead Tibetans kept at Xishan mortuary in Lhasa, in addition to four other Tibetans, whose autopsy reports were included in the internal document. The total number of dead according to this document alone is 26. Of them 15 died from gun shot wounds, out of which 11 were confirmed as Tibetan, while the identity of the other 4 remains unknown at the moment,” said the TCHRD.

Most of the Tibetans, according to this document, were killed on 14 March 2008, in localities such as at the intersection of Second Lubug Street, the Ramoche Temple, Ching Phin guesthouse, fifth division of the construction factory near Ramoche Temple, Goten Hospital for Nuns at Barkor, near Tengyeling, Gaden Khangsar, and on the street in front of Serkhang guesthouse at Beijing Road.

The autopsy reports performed on the four Tibetans by Lhasa PSB show that one of them had received 17 gun shot wounds while two women were shot 15 times and eight times respectively.

Brief information about the 15 Tibetans killed by security forces, as revealed in the secret document prepared by Lhasa PSB

1. Lhakpa Tsering, Tibetan, male, 32 years old, born in Lhasa. He was shot at 2nd Lubug Street on 14 March 2008. His body was recovered at around 5 pm on 17 March 2008 from his house at No. 11, 2nd Lubug Street.

2. Dejung, Tibetan, male, 41 years old, born in Phusum Township, Nyemo County. He was shot at on 17 March 2008 at an undisclosed location. His body was recovered at around noon on 17 March 2008, from his home located at No. 5, 6th Lubug Street.

3. Tenzin Dolker, Tibetan, female, 20 years old, born in Lhasa. She was shot on 14 March 2008 on the road just across the Serkhang guesthouse on Lhasa’s Beijing Road. Her body was recovered at 12.30 pm from her home at House No. 9, Tengyeling, Barkor, on 18 March 2008.

4. Pentrug, Tibetan, male, 20 years old, born in Gyabrag village, Tsongdu Township, Lhundrup County. He was shot on 14 March 2008 at an undisclosed location. His body was recovered at 11. 40 pm on 16 March 2008 from within the compound of House No. 10, 1st Gangden Khangsar Street.

5. Tashi Tsering, Tibetan, male, 44 years old, born in Jhakhyung township, Bathang County, Sichuan province. He was shot on 14 March 2008 near Ramoche Temple in Lhasa. His body was recovered at 2 pm on 18 March 2008 from House No. 43, Group 1 of Gyatso neighborhood in Lhasa.

6. Wangdu Dhargye, Tibetan, male, around 24 years old. He was a driver by profession and born in Nyingdrong Township, Damshung County, Lhasa. He was shot at an undisclosed location on 14 March 2008. His body was recovered at 12.10 pm on 16 March 2008 from a construction factory near Ramoche Temple.

7. Unidentified, Tibetan, male, 1.7 meters tall in height. Information on his birthplace and the time he was shot remains unknown. His body was recovered at around 8 pm on 16 March 2008 at a hill near Village No. 2, Dogde Township near Lhasa.

8. Unidentified, Tibetan, female, 1.5 meters tall in height. Her body was recovered near Ching Phin hotel/guesthouse, Lhasa.

9. Unidentified, Tibetan, female, 1.54 meters tall in height. Her body was recovered in the afternoon of 14 March 2008 near Ching Phin guesthouse in Lhasa.

10. Unidentified, Tibetan, male, 1.84 meters tall in height. His body was recovered in the afternoon of 14 March 2008 near Ching Phin guesthouse, Lhasa.

11. Unidentified, male, nationality and birthplace remain unknown. He was shot on 14 March 2008 at Ching Phin guesthouse near Ramoche Temple. His body was recovered the same day near Ching Phin guesthouse, Lhasa.

12. Unidentified, female, nationality and birthplace remain unknown. She was shot on 14 March 2008 at Ching Phin guesthouse near Ramoche Temple. Her body was found the same day near Ching Phin guesthouse, Lhasa.

13. Unidentified, male, nationality and birthplace remain unknown. His body was found on 16 March 2008 near Tsuklakhang temple, Lhasa.

14. Unidentified, female, nationality and birthplace remain unknown. She was shot on 14 March 2008 at Ching Phin guesthouse near Ramoche temple. Her body was found the same day near Ching Phin guesthouse near Ramoche Temple, Lhasa.

15. Unidentified, female. Information on her birthplace and the exact time she was shot remains unknown. although she was shot on 14 March 2008. Her body was recovered at Goten Hospital for Nuns(?) on 16 March 2008.

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